Gallery of Art

Handmade Sinks...

Thrown on the potter’s wheel- starting with a 20 lb lump of clay, these unique and beautiful basins add a strong focal point to your bathroom. They are designed to fit standard plumbing connections. Custom orders are welcomed, and since each sink is handmade, I can meet your specifications as far as size- from tiny ½ bath powder rooms to large matching pairs in the master bath. Drop in (traditional rim mounted) sinks and Vessel ( above counter) sinks are usually in stock- Pedestal sinks, and some other surprises, are in the works! stay tuned…

Stoneware Aquariums...

 

Stoneware Aquariums are extremely strong, as well as a unique step away from the ordinary fish bowl.

Body Vessels...

Body Vessels are a tribute to the human body.

Games...

These clay gaming boards and pieces have a regal look to them so that they can be enjoyed for the competition and fun, as well as for decoration.

Palmetto Pieces...

 

The story of how the Palmetto Tree and Crescent became symbols of South Carolina, dates back to the Revolutionary war.

In 1776, the British army, then the most powerful military force in the world, had moved down to blockade the port of Charleston. They attacked Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island, which was built out of Palmetto logs. Instead of shattering from the bombardment, the spongy logs absorbed the cannon balls and did not fail. The troops that were manning the fort wore a metal crescent called a gorget, on their hats. Gorgets were originally a piece of knight’s armor worn as a throat protector, but had eventually evolved into a decorative crescent. These two items were soon placed together and have been used as symbols of South Carolina ever since.

I have created several Palmetto items: blue stoneware plates of two different sizes, large Palmetto mugs, Palmetto tiles/coasters (4"x4") and the beautiful sgraffito wall piece, "The Governor’s Plate".

The Potter's Lifestyle...

"Seeking the Beauty of the visual Poetry - the Rhythms - the Music - the Dance. The cooperation between materials and time - discipline and surprise."

Rob Gentry - 2010